Late Autumn (1960)

The great actress and Ozu regular Setsuko Hara plays a mother gently trying to persuade her daughter to marry in this glowing portrait of family love and conflict—a reworking...
Poster for the movie "Late Autumn"
© 1960 Shôchiku Eiga − All right reserved.

Late Autumn

19602 h 08 min
Overview

The great actress and Ozu regular Setsuko Hara plays a mother gently trying to persuade her daughter to marry in this glowing portrait of family love and conflict—a reworking of Ozu’s 1949 masterpiece Late Spring.

Metadata
Director Yasujirō Ozu
Runtime 2 h 08 min
Release Date 13 November 1960
Details
Movie Media DVD
Movie Status Available
Movie Rating Very good

Late-Autumn-001

Yasujiro Ozu continues to impress.

I discovered Ozu’s work when I went to a screening of ‘Late Spring’. I instantly fell in love with his work and his use of cinematography. A director as simplistic as he was captured the essence of pure emotion from all of his actors. That to me stood out and will forever keep me intertwined with his films.

Ozu’s ‘Late Autumn’ to me is a perspective from the mother’s point of view. If you have seen ‘Late Spring’, you will know what I am talking about. Something that we all get out of his films, is his choice of mood. The under tone of his films are so calm and relaxing. ‘Late Autumn’ takes you on a portrayal of a mother and daughter’s relationship and how the bond of these two prove inseparable. One of many reoccurring actors throughout Ozu’s films, Setsuko Hara is cast as the lead. This time she is the mother of a teenage daughter whom share a very close bond, realizing that soon she will have to wed and carry on with her life. As disapproving as it is to the daughter, we all know that you can’t always live with your parents forever, in this case her mother. We aren’t introduced to the father at all, as I assume he has passed away. As the story progresses, we tend to feel for these characters emotionally.

This film as well as many other Ozu film’s is simplistic and always tends to carry on the same message. Living is a progression of life, how we view it at the present time will effect how we live our future. Ozu shoots out another masterpiece and I highly recommend it.

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